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Quotes

17-05-21

Paulo Coelho: Suffering and dreaming

Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dream.

Paulo Coelho

Paulo Coelho ( Rio de Janeiro, August 24, 1947) is a Brazilian lyricist and novelist. He has become one of the most widely read authors in the world today with over 140 million books sold in more than 150 countries, translated into 73 languages. He is the recipient of numerous international awards, amongst them the Crystal Award by the World Economic Forum, France's Légion d'honneur and the Gold Medal of Galicia, among many other awards he has received thanks to his commercial success. Since October 2002 he is a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. In addition to receiving international top awards and citations, he is currently a special advisor of the Unesco for the spiritual convergence program and Intercultural Dialogues and Messenger of Peace United Nations since 2007.

14-05-21

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Looking for happiness

Those who are not looking for happiness are the most likely to find it, because those who are searching forget that the surest way to be happy is to seek happiness for others.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929 - April 4, 1968) was an American pastor, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs. He was born Michael King, but his father changed his name in honor of the German reformer Martin Luther. A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, in 1962, and organized nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama, that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history. On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled "Beyond Vietnam".

13-05-21

Santosh Kalwar: Addicted to our thoughts

We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking.

Santosh Kalwar

Santosh Kalwar (born September 7, 1982, Chitwan, Nepal) is a poet, writer and researcher. He is Nepalese writer who writes in English. He was born and raised in Chitwan, Nepal, and came to study in Finland at the age of twenty-five. He has authored a number of Newspaper columns, articles and books on truth, love and relationships.

Biography taken over from PoemHunter.

12-05-21

Sagar Prakash Khatnani: Disappointment

Disappointment always looks for a culprit, even if he is innocent.

Sagar Prakash Khatnani

Sagar Prakash Khatnani (Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, June 6, 1983) is a Spanish writer of Indian descent.

After winning several literature competitions, he decided to write his first book. For more than six years he wrote in his free hours at night to complete the book. This book was published in 2013. In 2018 he published his second book Sawai, 21 stories about what really counts.

11-05-21

George Eliot: Roses

It will never rain roses: when we want to have more roses, we must plant more roses.

George Eliot

Mary Ann Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880; alternatively Mary Anne or Marian), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She wrote seven novels, Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Romola (1862–63), Felix Holt, the Radical (1866), Middlemarch (1871–72) and Daniel Deronda (1876). Like Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy, she emerged from provincial England and most of her works are set there. They are known for their realism, psychological insight, sense of place and detailed depiction of the countryside.

Although female authors were published under their own names during her lifetime, she wanted to escape the stereotype of women's writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as a translator, editor and critic. Another factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny.